Updates from September, 2016 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Rick Mc 3:03 am on September 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Special Needs Gymnastics 

    special-needs-gymnastics Jamie Pacton:

    Gymnastics can benefit kids tremendously, especially kids with special needs.

    Liam, my 7-year-old with autism, has been working with a gymnastics coach for almost two years, and in that time, he’s made huge gains in motor skills, following directions, expressive language, and confidence. …

    When he first started, he was timid, resistant, and uncoordinated; now his confidence shines through in every activity he completes. …


    My overall philosophy on children with special needs is very similar to how I approach coaching children of all abilities. Confidence comes from success, however children cannot make the distinctions between failing at a skill and being a failure. This is why progressions or deescalating a skill is so imperative in teaching. Adjusting and breaking a skill into its most minute parts assures individual success regardless of skill level and is pertinent in developing a positive sense of self and task mastery. …

    How Adaptive Gymnastics Helps Kids with Special Needs

    • bellabounce 1:43 am on September 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Bella Bounces and commented:
      I love this! I’m learning more and more about different disabilities and how to adapt my coaching and I can honestly say that Jamie has unlocked an absolutely vital key – breaking things down. I’ve met a lot of children who have little confidence in their own ability and become easily upset or frustrated if they perceive that they ‘can’t’ do something and more often than not these aren’t people with whom you can explain that it won’t be perfect the first time around! Little victories working towards a bigger long term goal, even if the long term goal is one complete skill is the absolute key to keeping them keen, learning and having fun. Infinite patience and creativity when teaching little bits of skills is also required, ’cause who wants to do step 1 over and over again?

      Liked by 1 person

  • Rick Mc 3:02 am on September 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Finland – Children need 3 hours exercise / day 

    Parents have been advised to actively encourage their children to pursue hobbies and interests that require physical exertion.

    Children aged eight and under have been targeted in the move.

    Finland is known for producing some of the most physically fit children in Europe.

    It also produces some of the highest academic results among schoolchildren in the developed world. …

    Children need three hours exercise a day – Finland


    Guidelines issued by the World Health Organisation (WHO) suggest that children and young teenagers aged between 5 and 17 should perform at least an hour of moderate physical exercise a day. Finland recommends triple that.

  • Rick Mc 3:03 am on September 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Beam walks 

    Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

  • Rick Mc 3:02 am on September 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    getting HANDS on the Beam 

    Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

  • Rick Mc 8:31 pm on August 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Building a Rec Boys Gymnastics Program 

    by site editor Rick McCharles

    Many excellent girls Gymnastics clubs underserve boys in their market. Brothers are sitting in the parents seating area – restless – waiting on sisters. That’s a waste.

    The best boys Gymnastics clubs have as high a ratio as 1 boy for every 3 girls. That kind of ratio is possible.

    Ashwad Springer

    First priority for boys coaches is increasing the base. Increasing the numbers of boys trying Gymnastics and other acrobatic sports.

    Once in the Gym many will find they like the sport. It’s FUN. Keep it FUN.

    have fun

    Boys love Games, Contests and Challenges. Most boys love height and flight. Excitement.

    rope block tower

    Once hooked on the sport, next priority is improvement of Physical (Endurance, Stringy, Power, Flexibility, etc.) and Motor (Agility, Balance, Coordination, Spatial awareness, etc.) fitness.

    Skills are lower priority than for girls the same age.

    Role models are important for boys. It’s important coaches and the eldest and most advanced boys in the club be leaders.

    Clubs who do want to increase the size and quality of the boys Recreation program have two major problems:

    • hiring competent, experienced men’s coaches
    • getting boys into the gym to give it a go

    There are far fewer boys coaches available than girls coaches. Some serious effort may be required to recruit and train boys Rec coaches.

    In 2016 Parkour / Ninja classes are very popular with boys. Boys parents are very keen to keep their sons doing Parkour safe.

    Once in the Gym some of those Ninja boys will get interested in the Artistic competitive apparatus.

    I like “bring-a-friend” day, as well. Check the insurance implications of bringing in a friend to your Gym.

    rope swing

    related – Gymnastics Ontario Congress 2016BUILDING A RECREATIONAL BOYS PROGRAM presentation notes PDF

  • Rick Mc 3:03 am on August 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Canadian kids are not fit 

    Parents should know that schools are NOT physically educating their children.😦

    The latest ParticipACTION Report Card examines kids’ overall physical activity and, for the first time, grades their movement skills. There’s a lot of room for improvement.


    Canadian kids are getting a D-minus in physical activity

    Quoted in that article is Mount Royal University movement education instructor Nadine Van Wyk, former Gymnastics coach. She knows fitness.

  • Rick Mc 3:02 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    learning backward walkover 

    The best way is with the feet elevated. This puts most of the weight on the shoulders and upper back, protecting the lower back.

    Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

  • Rick Mc 3:03 am on August 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Gymnastics is a FOUNDATION sport 

    Recreational gymnastics is a foundation sport. It teaches children to run, jump, and fall properly.

    Physical literacy is the ability to know one’s body, to love movement, and to carry that through life.

    Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

  • Rick Mc 2:36 pm on July 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Gymnastics NINJA obstacle course 

    Cutting Edge Gymnastics in Michigan has greatly expanded their boys programs with parkour training. Motor and Physical fitness is the goal, not necessarily specific skills.

    Click the IMAGE to play or watch it on Google+.

    Ninja course

    That video was produced by Doug Davis at Heart Tech Plus. The goal is to monitor heart rate and other variables while kids “play“.

  • Rick Mc 3:06 am on July 14, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Group Balance Activities 

    by site editor Rick McCharles

    The ability to balance on the TOP of your head is an important skill. Here’s one series of progressions from beginner to advanced.

    Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

    See ALL the Games posted so far (over 100) on the Rick McCharles Tumbl Trak Fitness Games YouTube channel.

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